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Aspiring Pathololgist with a morbid curiosity
134 notes
4 hours ago - Reblog

moshita:

The Morgue, 

investigates ideas of death and our relationship with it. Working with a forensic pathologist Serrano photographed the bodies with a near classical beauty rarely associated with the morgue.  Serrano ensured the anonymity of each person through tight cropping or veiling the face.

Andres Serrano

2 notes
7 hours ago - Reblog

I found and nearly ate a dead moth that had got into my bran flakes this morning :S

77 notes
7 hours ago - Reblog
backspatter:

This motorcyclist sustained a fatal head injury. The brain shows extensive right frontal and temporal contusions with evidence of diffuse traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage.

backspatter:

This motorcyclist sustained a fatal head injury. The brain shows extensive right frontal and temporal contusions with evidence of diffuse traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage.

(via necessaryhealth)

150 notes
21 hours ago - Reblog
mindblowingscience:

Blood Test Could Detect A Genetic Tendency Toward Suicide

By Loren Grush Posted 07.30.2014 at 12:01 am
When it comes to fighting suicide, knowing who is at risk can be tricky and, moreover, a very subjective process. Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine are trying to bring a level of objectivity into the search for those at high risk of attempting suicide – in the form of a simple blood test.
In a new study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, researchers say they have found something of a common denominator in people who have committed suicide or those with suicidal thoughts or attempts. The key? A unique genetic mutation in the gene SKA2, which is thought to play an important role in the way our brains handle stress. Not everyone at risk of suicide has the genetic signature, but when people do have this mutation, their likelihood of attempting suicide was found to be extremely high compared to the rest of the population.
“SKA2 has been implicated as important for the normal function of stress receptors,” said study leader Zachary Kaminsky, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “It chaperones them, and it goes up when glucocorticoid binds to these receptors, which happens when you get stressed out.”

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Blood Test Could Detect A Genetic Tendency Toward Suicide

By Loren Grush Posted 07.30.2014 at 12:01 am

When it comes to fighting suicide, knowing who is at risk can be tricky and, moreover, a very subjective process. Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine are trying to bring a level of objectivity into the search for those at high risk of attempting suicide – in the form of a simple blood test.

In a new study published in the American Journal of Psychiatryresearchers say they have found something of a common denominator in people who have committed suicide or those with suicidal thoughts or attempts. The key? A unique genetic mutation in the gene SKA2, which is thought to play an important role in the way our brains handle stress. Not everyone at risk of suicide has the genetic signature, but when people do have this mutation, their likelihood of attempting suicide was found to be extremely high compared to the rest of the population.

“SKA2 has been implicated as important for the normal function of stress receptors,” said study leader Zachary Kaminsky, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “It chaperones them, and it goes up when glucocorticoid binds to these receptors, which happens when you get stressed out.”

Continue Reading.

(via greigferguson)

3 notes
1 day ago - Reblog

I hit a bird that flew into my windscreen today and it exploded :/ Poor thing

473 notes
1 day ago - Reblog
thepreppyyogini:

Amen.

thepreppyyogini:

Amen.

(Source: pinterest.com, via postgrad-premed)

134 notes
1 day ago - Reblog
nprglobalhealth:

American Doctor Sick With Ebola Now Fighting For His Life
A doctor trained in Fort Worth, Texas, is now a victim of the Ebola outbreak he was battling.
Kent Brantly, 33, had been caring for Ebola patients in Liberia’s capital, Monrovia, for several months when he noticed he had symptoms of the deadly virus last Wednesday.
He immediately put himself into an isolation ward.
"He is still conversing and is in isolation. But he is seriously ill with a very grave prognosis," says Dr. David McRay, of John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, who spoke to Brantly by phone on Monday.
"Kent is a calm, confident, focused individual, with a deep calling for the work that he’s doing," McRay says.
After Brantly completed his residency at John Peter Smith Hospital in 2013, he traveled to West Africa with his wife and two children to work with the Christian aid group Samaritan’s Purse.
Then the Ebola outbreak started in March. Samaritan’s Purse asked Brantly to direct the group’s Ebola Consolidated Case Management Center in Monrovia.
Since then, about 1,200 people have fallen ill with Ebola, and more than 670 have died across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. There’s no treatment for the disease, which spreads when people come into direct contact with bodily fluids, such as saliva, blood, diarrhea and vomit.
Brantly knew providing health care in Liberia would be challenging — and that was even before the Ebola epidemic. But caring for people in need, his friends say, was always what he wanted to do.
Continue reading.
Photo: Medical workers treat Ebola patients at the Eternal Love Winning Africa hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. Three workers at the hospital, including Dr. Kent Brantly (left), have tested positive for Ebola.(Courtesy of Samaritan’s Purse)

nprglobalhealth:

American Doctor Sick With Ebola Now Fighting For His Life

A doctor trained in Fort Worth, Texas, is now a victim of the Ebola outbreak he was battling.

Kent Brantly, 33, had been caring for Ebola patients in Liberia’s capital, Monrovia, for several months when he noticed he had symptoms of the deadly virus last Wednesday.

He immediately put himself into an isolation ward.

"He is still conversing and is in isolation. But he is seriously ill with a very grave prognosis," says Dr. David McRay, of John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, who spoke to Brantly by phone on Monday.

"Kent is a calm, confident, focused individual, with a deep calling for the work that he’s doing," McRay says.

After Brantly completed his residency at John Peter Smith Hospital in 2013, he traveled to West Africa with his wife and two children to work with the Christian aid group Samaritan’s Purse.

Then the Ebola outbreak started in March. Samaritan’s Purse asked Brantly to direct the group’s Ebola Consolidated Case Management Center in Monrovia.

Since then, about 1,200 people have fallen ill with Ebola, and more than 670 have died across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. There’s no treatment for the disease, which spreads when people come into direct contact with bodily fluids, such as saliva, blood, diarrhea and vomit.

Brantly knew providing health care in Liberia would be challenging — and that was even before the Ebola epidemic. But caring for people in need, his friends say, was always what he wanted to do.

Continue reading.

Photo: Medical workers treat Ebola patients at the Eternal Love Winning Africa hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. Three workers at the hospital, including Dr. Kent Brantly (left), have tested positive for Ebola.(Courtesy of Samaritan’s Purse)

116 notes
1 day ago - Reblog
jewsee-medicalstudent:

First biological pacemaker created by transplanting gene into hearts.
The contraction of cardiac muscle is initiated by electrical impulses. The cells that create these rhythmical impulses are called pacemaker cells, and they directly control the heart rate. They are located in the sinoatrial node (SA node), positioned on the wall of the right atrium, near the entrance of the superior vena cava, and they are modified cardiomyocyte.
Patients with irregular heartbeats or blockages often need an artificial pacemaker to replace the heart’s defective pacemaker duties. But now, cardiologists from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, CA, have created a gene transplant procedure that transforms heart cells into a biological pacemaker that regulates the heart’s beating.
For their study, the team injected laboratory pigs that had complete heart block with a gene called TBX18, through a minimally invasive procedure using a catheter. On the very next day, the team observed that the pigs who received the gene had "significantly" faster heartbeats, compared with the pigs who did not receive the gene, and this stronger heartbeat remained throughout the entire 14-day study.
(To read more).

jewsee-medicalstudent:

First biological pacemaker created by transplanting gene into hearts.

The contraction of cardiac muscle is initiated by electrical impulses. The cells that create these rhythmical impulses are called pacemaker cells, and they directly control the heart rate. They are located in the sinoatrial node (SA node), positioned on the wall of the right atrium, near the entrance of the superior vena cava, and they are modified cardiomyocyte.

Patients with irregular heartbeats or blockages often need an artificial pacemaker to replace the heart’s defective pacemaker duties. But now, cardiologists from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, CA, have created a gene transplant procedure that transforms heart cells into a biological pacemaker that regulates the heart’s beating.

For their study, the team injected laboratory pigs that had complete heart block with a gene called TBX18, through a minimally invasive procedure using a catheter. On the very next day, the team observed that the pigs who received the gene had "significantly" faster heartbeats, compared with the pigs who did not receive the gene, and this stronger heartbeat remained throughout the entire 14-day study.

(To read more).

(via victorianavina)

397 notes
1 day ago - Reblog
mindblowingscience:

This is the worst Ebola outbreak in history. Here’s why you should be worried.

By Ishaan Tharoor July 28 at 2:12 PM
The worst Ebola outbreak in history has put a number of countries in West Africa in lockdown, led to the deaths of nearly 700 people since February and brought new reports of doctors, including Americans, contracting the virus they are attempting to contain. The situation is undeniably scary. Here’s what you need to know.
What is Ebola?
Ebola viral disease is a highly infectious illness with fatality rates up to 90 percent, according to the U.N. World Health Organization. Symptoms initially include a sudden fever as well as joint and muscle aches and then typically progress to vomiting, diarrhea and, in some cases, internal and external bleeding — you can see a full, grim description of symptoms compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) here.
The virus spreads through contact with bodily fluids of someone who is infected. Reports of human infections usually first emerge in remote areas that are in proximity to tropical rain forests, where humans can come into contact with animals such as chimpanzees, gorillas and forest antelope. The consumption of bush meat is often a precursor to such outbreaks. The WHO says fruit bats are probably the natural host for the virus.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

This is the worst Ebola outbreak in history. Here’s why you should be worried.

 July 28 at 2:12 PM

The worst Ebola outbreak in history has put a number of countries in West Africa in lockdown, led to the deaths of nearly 700 people since February and brought new reports of doctors, including Americans, contracting the virus they are attempting to contain. The situation is undeniably scary. Here’s what you need to know.

What is Ebola?

Ebola viral disease is a highly infectious illness with fatality rates up to 90 percent, according to the U.N. World Health Organization. Symptoms initially include a sudden fever as well as joint and muscle aches and then typically progress to vomiting, diarrhea and, in some cases, internal and external bleeding — you can see a full, grim description of symptoms compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) here.

The virus spreads through contact with bodily fluids of someone who is infected. Reports of human infections usually first emerge in remote areas that are in proximity to tropical rain forests, where humans can come into contact with animals such as chimpanzees, gorillas and forest antelope. The consumption of bush meat is often a precursor to such outbreaks. The WHO says fruit bats are probably the natural host for the virus.

Continue Reading.

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)

201 notes
2 days ago - Reblog

How patients feel during early morning bedside rounds

whatshouldwecallmedschool:

160 notes
2 days ago - Reblog

When my stubborn fall risk patient gets up without calling for help:

adenosinetriesphosphate:

nursingistheshit:

I laughed out loud.

795 notes
2 days ago - Reblog

"Years ago, death was considered a natural part of life and most people died at home, surrounded by families. Today, most people die in hospitals and death is commonly regarded as a medical failure rather than a natural event."

Emergency Nursing made Incredibly Easy (2007) Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (via traumabarbie)

This is what I have been trying to say!

(via jmu-nurse-xo)

(via aspiringthoracicsurgeon)

266 notes
3 days ago - Reblog
ragincontagion:

A Colles’ fracture is a fracture of the distal radius bone above the radio-carpal joint without involvement of the ulnar bone resulting in a posterior and radial displacement of the hand. It’s usually the result of someone trying to break a fall on their outstretched arm and has a high prevalence among patients with osteoporosis.

ragincontagion:

Colles’ fracture is a fracture of the distal radius bone above the radio-carpal joint without involvement of the ulnar bone resulting in a posterior and radial displacement of the hand. It’s usually the result of someone trying to break a fall on their outstretched arm and has a high prevalence among patients with osteoporosis.

(Source: img.medscape.com, via stumble-my)

346 notes
4 days ago - Reblog
i-heart-histo:

How to construct a blood vessel!
Making sense of the histology of arteries and veins
Source:
If you like words, the full post about How to classify blood vessels (including this image) visit the ihearthisto.com post here
Or you can just sit back, watch and realize that you just learned about the tunics of a vessel. That’s histology folks!
Have fun,
i♡histo

i-heart-histo:

How to construct a blood vessel!

Making sense of the histology of arteries and veins

Source:

If you like words, the full post about How to classify blood vessels (including this image) visit the ihearthisto.com post here

Or you can just sit back, watch and realize that you just learned about the tunics of a vessel. That’s histology folks!

Have fun,

i♡histo

(via medical-student)

1 note
5 days ago - Reblog

So I’ve ripped half my fingernail by refilling a water tank. I dropped it and my fingernail was caught on a bit sticking out, so it ripped half of it backwards. Oh the pain!